Category Archives: Food

Moderation Provides the Key

Home | Elections 2012 | Moderation Provides the Key

MONTICELLO — Two black cats laze on the hardwoods while the gray perches in the high chair.

Cats — big and small — seldom waste steps, in essence an efficiently ruthless killing machine. If not on the prowl, they move in moderation.

Life is generally good in moderation. Excess breeds addiction.


According to historian Donald Holley, Monticello helped lead the anti-liquor movement within the state in the late 1800s, as the local Women’s Christian Temperance Union shut down the town’s saloons in 1888.  The Monticello chapter of the Ku Klux Klan provided “extra-legal assistance” in Prohibition enforcement during the 1920s.

In short, Monticello faces a truly historic challenge this fall as it considers whether to go “wet.”

I know this mindset, i.e. I grew up Missionary Baptist. We didn’t drink; we didn’t dance.

But I needed money to go to the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. I didn’t come from a lot of money; I worked two or three jobs at a time going to school. I waited tables, barbacked and bartended my way through, earning a bachelor’s and master’s without owing anyone a dime in student loans.

Mama Macy grieved me for “slingin’ that whisky.” It paid the bills.

Does alcohol negatively affect people? To say it doesn’t would be disingenuous. But it is also disingenuous to pretend keeping sales outside the city limits will “save” the inhabitants of Drew County. Years ago when I first came through Monticello, you would drive by a “Jesus Saves … Let Him” sign just prior to getting to the liquor store.

Drink responsibly! Use wooden wine glasses in hot tubs!

I would encourage the good citizens of Monticello to let him save, but otherwise help the city gain sales tax revenue from bringing alcohol-serving businesses into town. Morality should not be legislated; it’s easy to make laws to target folks, but then don’t be surprised when you end up targeted.

The vast majority of adults who drink do so in moderation, which is great not only for alcohol but also for proselytizing.


Ani DiFranco plays “Which Side Are You On?” in the background.


One last drop: It’s time for a “sin” tax on soft drinks in Arkansas. For those so concerned about what I’m drinking, two can play at that game.


Letter to Hershey’s

Home | Food | Letter to Hershey’s
Dr. Sitton

I wrote the following to Hershey’s, the chocolate giant, to request they quit using child labor.

To show I’m serious, I’m boycotting Hershey’s chocolate bars, Hershey’s Kisses, Bliss chocolates, York patties, Kit Kats, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, Almond Joys, Mounds, Twizzlers, as well as Cadbury or Carmello candies (Hershey’s has licensing agreements with them).

If you’re serious about your chocolate, join me in this boycott and let Hershey’s know about it:




Good morning.

It is with grave concern that I write you today. As a child I visited the Hershey factory in Pennsylvania. I fondly remember the “history” of chocolate shown by GI Joe figures (not dressed in fatigues, of course). Every since then, I’ve been a huge Hershey’s fan … until recently.

I found out your company still uses child labor from this article:

Why? According to your Corporate Social Responsibility Reports (granted, not updated since 2010 —, today’s Hershey continues to build “on Milton Hershey’s legacy of commitment to consumers, community and children, we provide high-quality Hershey products while conducting our business in a socially responsible and environmentally sustainable manner.” Would Milton approve of child labor?

C’mon, we’re in the 21st century for crying out loud! I’ve alerted all of my facebook friends to this problem and have vowed to not eat any Hershey’s chocolate until this issue is fixed. You cannot fathom how difficult it is for me to say that, as I’m sure I could be certified as a chocoholic. But I’m steadfast in my resolve not to contribute to such atrocities.

Please stop this heinous practice immediately so that I can get back to my favorite past time of eating Hershey’s chocolate.


Ronald Sitton, Ph.D.

Eat Southern Foods!

Home | Food | Eat Southern Foods!

The Southern Food & Beverage Museum declared Sunday, Oct. 11 to be the first Southern Food Heritage Day. (Luckily, I started early by eating fried Oreos from the Arkansas State Fair.) If you don’t have any idea what to make to celebrate this day, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with our Southern Compendium entry. Granted, some of the links are toast … but that’s probably keeping some of us healthy! Seriously, I’ll try to update it with some healthy food choices added.