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Straight Outta Arkansas!


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Moving Down the Road, Acknowledging Debts

Home | A Traveling Arkansan | Moving Down the Road, Acknowledging Debts

SOMEWHERE ON I-81, Va. — Tell your mama, tell your paw … We’re heading back to Arkansas.

Due to transporting three dogs and two humans and the problems finding accommodations with Wifi along the way, the news links may or may not be posted tomorrow. If not, visit our sister site, The Locust Fork News-Journal. But look for us to return as soon as technology provides.

You may have noticed the photos of people reading with the news links. This idea came from reading Mr. SEC, the definitive site to read everything you wanted to know about Southeast Conference football and basketball. You may occasionally find sports-related material here, but we plan to concentrate on bringing you other aspects of the South.

As a tease of sorts, I expect to receive photos of the group who stood for the Pine Bluff soldier once I get home. If that comes through, expect to see them as soon as I can post them.

Until.

Group Plans to Shield Soldier’s Service

Home | Arkansawyer | Group Plans to Shield Soldier’s Service
soldier

An Arkansas high school teacher’s facebook page to “Preserve the Honor of Fallen Pine Bluff Soldier” plans to buffer funeral participants from a Westboro Baptist Church protest Saturday afternoon at Pine Bluff’s St. Joseph Catholic Church.

John Allison, a 44-year-old former Marine who teaches math at Vilonia High School, started the page Friday afternoon; by midnight, 62 of the more than 1,800 invitees confirmed they would attend with an additional 31 maybes. (UPDATE: Those attending topped 100 by 10:30 CST this morning.)

The stated goal of attendees is to keep the Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, Kan., from disrupting the memorial service for fallen Arkansas soldier, Sgt. Michael J. Strachota of the U.S. Army. Strachota died June 24 in Afghanistan, a week and a half prior to a scheduled home leave on July 5.

“Please join us to peaceably make certain these disrespectful hatemongers are far enough removed they cannot disrupt the service or upset the family and friends,” Allison writes. “Help us prevent this so-called church from dishonoring this man’s honorable service and sacrifice.”

A press release indicates WBC will preach “in respectful, lawful proximity” that God kills American soldiers as punishment for sin. The flier uses incendiary language about military personnel, including the phrase, “Thank God for IEDs.”

In stark contrast, Allison provided five ground rules for those providing a “shield”:

“1. This will be a peaceful undertaking. We are certainly not here to cause a scene that will cause more of a disturbance than WBC. Our goal is not to shout, scream, or strike those gathered with WBC.
“2. Do not bring weapons of any kind: no guns, knives, mace, pepper spray, or anything else you might be tempted to use as a weapon.
“3. Our goal is to get enough people together to shield those attending the memorial service from the WBC protesters.
“4. Flags, crosses, crucifixes, other symbols of patriotism and religion are welcome. If you wish to make signs, they should have only positive messages honoring the courage and sacrifice, nothing derogatory or demeaning toward any person or group. Remember, we are there to help honor Sgt. Strachota, not to protest or make a political statement.
“5. We have now learned the Patriot Guard will be at the service also. They do this all the time at military funerals across the country so we will fall in with them and follow their lead.”

According to the Patriot Guard Riders’ website, the motorcycle enthusiasts “standing for those who stood for us” will also be in attendance. The group warns participants to hydrate; the Weather Channel predicts it will be 95-96 degrees by the 1 p.m. start, though the 46 percent humidity will make it feel like 104.

(EDITOR’s NOTE: Allison and the reporter attended Northeast High School in the late ’80s.)

TV Land Honors Griffith This Weekend

Home | Media | TV Land Honors Griffith This Weekend
TVLand

Regional Differences Drive Church v. Beer Tweets

Home | Beer | Regional Differences Drive Church v. Beer Tweets
Courtesy of floatingsheep.org
Courtesy of floatingsheep.org

OLNEY, Md. — Not to be missed during this time of our national heat stroke, floatingsheep.org provides a regional breakdown of differences indicated by tweets concerning “church” or “beer.”

Betcha couldn’t guess which terms pops up more often in the South, could ya? Should we be surprised that it so closely corresponds to those areas where alcohol is still BANNED although Prohibition was repealed in 1933?

courtesy of io9.com

Will the South come into the 21st century in my lifetime? Doubtful.

Happy Birthday, America!

Home | Southern Scene | Happy Birthday, America!
But PLEASE be careful in the dry areas, i.e. we’d like to wake to green instead of black come Thursday.

Save the BEER!

Home | Beer | Save the BEER!

Truly a disaster waiting to happen …

Racing Against the Thermometer

‘Opie’ Remembers ‘Ang’

Home | News | ‘Opie’ Remembers ‘Ang’

Editor’s Note: See also:

Ron Howard: What I Learned from Andy Griffith in the Los Angeles Times

Ron Howard says co-star Andy Griffith was a leader, a mentor and coach in the New York Daily News

The South Mourns 20th Century Icon

Home | A Traveling Arkansan | The South Mourns 20th Century Icon

OLNEY, Md. – The South — and the world — mourns today following news of Andy Griffith’s demise.

The 86-year-old came into our homes more than half a century on this newfangled contraption called TV. He made us laugh, a LOT, and brought the down-home goodness of Mayberry into the American conscious.

Sure, Andy Griffith played roles other than Andy Taylor, but no other role suited him so.

***

I started watching “The Andy Griffith Show” when my mom married my dad, Leroy Sitton, in 1977. Dad worked for the Arkansas State Police. I’m – still – a redhead. And Ronny Howard actually knew to spell his name with a “y.” It all rolled from there. In hindsight, I’m only surprised that it took until the 8th grade for Patrick Grogan to nickname me “Opie.”

Although I didn’t live in Mayberry, I learned a lot from watching Sheriff Taylor and the gang.

Watching Aunt Bee arrive to help with Opie in “The New Housekeeper” showed me acceptance may be hard, but love can overcome anything.

Watching the citizens of Mayberry’s hostility to a fella who knew everything about them in “Stranger in Town” showed me folks have NO IDEA about the long reach of media, which is particularly relevant in these days of facebook and twitter.

Watching Barney Fife take over as sheriff in “Andy Saves Barney’s Morale” showed me absolute power can corrupt absolutely.

I could go on, but I’m sure you have your favorite episodes.

Surprisingly, television allowed Griffith to portray a single dad in an era where single parents were frowned upon. By the time I came around, single dad-hood wasn’t a big deal as we received daily doses of “Family Affair.”

***

Otis puts himself back into his kennel.
The show made such an impact on me, we named our dog Otis after Mayberry’s town drunk. At first glance, this might seem to be a slight. But what else could we name the dog after he continually put himself in his kennel whenever he messed up?

***

Sunday would have been dad’s 74th birthday. In a way, I find it fitting that Andy Griffith died the week that marks dad’s birthday, my folk’s anniversary and the nation’s Independence Day.

The only way it would be more fitting would have been for “Ang” to pass on July 4th. But then again, he never was one to hog the spotlight.

We’ll miss you, sir.

***

Editor’s Note: A previous version left out the word “on” when discussing the reader’s favorite episodes and also contained an AP style error. All apologies.

Wake Up! America (or what’s left of it)

Home | Elections 2012 | Wake Up! America (or what’s left of it)

voteMONTICELLO — A few months ago I decided I would not vote for Barack Obama in 2012; now I have determined no one deserves to stay in their elected post this year.

First, though, I cannot vote for someone who tears down the Bill of Rights.

It’s one of the reasons I HATED George Bush, and I do not use the word HATE lightly. Obama signed HR 347 into law. I cannot “cotton” that. Making it illegal to protest near the president or anyone else with Secret Service protection IS cutting off your nose to spite your face. I tried, really hard, to stick with the man. I cannot do so any longer in good conscience.

I expected Obama to stand on principle, i.e. the Bill of Rights provides the entire foundation of our country’s individual freedoms. He knew when he signed the bill exactly what it would mean. It concerns me more than the economy, more than this flap over giving Mexican gangs guns — a stupid move by both the Bush and Obama administrations — more than Obama basically giving amnesty to illegal immigrants, more than the Republican attack on women and more than the Civil Rights struggle for gay Americans. Without the Bill of Rights, you cannot legally complain about any of that.

So I’ve made up my mind (and counted to three): They all must go.

The corruption starts in the legislature, permeates the executive branch and is codified by the judiciary. I honestly believed Obama would be different from Bush; he is, i.e. he’s more underhanded in implementing this crap. Makes me think we’ll see someone leap in to run against Obama and Romney at the last minute, which will seem like a fixer, but will ultimately turn out to be worse than anyone previously considered. I hope I’m wrong.

It’s a mixture of HR347 and the NDAA that’s scary. Once they get into the Bill of Rights, nothing will keep them from destroying it all. That’s a venerable piece of hemp containing these truths. It’s very fragile, just like our democracy — um, pardon me, republic. It’s the only thing that really keeps us civil when others start claiming the right to invade our bodies and our minds. Without it, them fightin’ words become dyin’ words. They don’t have to restrict a “press” in the hands of so few.

I don’t know of a greater evil than infringing on the Bill of Rights. Mixing religion and politics may be evil, but if we don’t have the Bill of Rights, it doesn’t matter if we think so. When they attack any of the Bill of Rights — free speech, religion, protest, owning guns, speedy trial by an impartial jury, no self-incrimination or mandatory housing of soldiers, no unreasonable search and seizure, no double jeopardy, no excessive bail, no cruel and unusual punishment, states granted rights not reserved for federal government and no one right having precedence over another — they attack it ALL. I cannot/will not stomach that.

The whole system needs an overhaul. I’ve decided to vote third party nationally; the other two are a joke. We won’t have true change until the duopoly breaks. When we keep choosing between the lesser of two evils, should we ever be surprised that they’re still evil?

They’re all to blame. I haven’t figure where my presidential vote goes yet, but it won’t be to the Republicans or the Democrats, who both seem set on destroying the Republic in favor of fascism.

I encourage you to vote if you’re taking the time to keep up. If not, please stay home rather than blindly give your vote to someone who does not have the nation’s best interests in his heart.

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Moderation Provides the Key

Home | Elections 2012 | Moderation Provides the Key
SAMSUNG DIGIMAX A503

MONTICELLO — Two black cats laze on the hardwoods while the gray perches in the high chair.

Cats — big and small — seldom waste steps, in essence an efficiently ruthless killing machine. If not on the prowl, they move in moderation.

Life is generally good in moderation. Excess breeds addiction.

***

According to historian Donald Holley, Monticello helped lead the anti-liquor movement within the state in the late 1800s, as the local Women’s Christian Temperance Union shut down the town’s saloons in 1888.  The Monticello chapter of the Ku Klux Klan provided “extra-legal assistance” in Prohibition enforcement during the 1920s.

In short, Monticello faces a truly historic challenge this fall as it considers whether to go “wet.”

I know this mindset, i.e. I grew up Missionary Baptist. We didn’t drink; we didn’t dance.

But I needed money to go to the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. I didn’t come from a lot of money; I worked two or three jobs at a time going to school. I waited tables, barbacked and bartended my way through, earning a bachelor’s and master’s without owing anyone a dime in student loans.

Mama Macy grieved me for “slingin’ that whisky.” It paid the bills.

Does alcohol negatively affect people? To say it doesn’t would be disingenuous. But it is also disingenuous to pretend keeping sales outside the city limits will “save” the inhabitants of Drew County. Years ago when I first came through Monticello, you would drive by a “Jesus Saves … Let Him” sign just prior to getting to the liquor store.

SAMSUNG DIGIMAX A503
Drink responsibly! Use wooden wine glasses in hot tubs!

I would encourage the good citizens of Monticello to let him save, but otherwise help the city gain sales tax revenue from bringing alcohol-serving businesses into town. Morality should not be legislated; it’s easy to make laws to target folks, but then don’t be surprised when you end up targeted.

The vast majority of adults who drink do so in moderation, which is great not only for alcohol but also for proselytizing.

***

Ani DiFranco plays “Which Side Are You On?” in the background.

***

One last drop: It’s time for a “sin” tax on soft drinks in Arkansas. For those so concerned about what I’m drinking, two can play at that game.

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